Online Teaching Institute 2022

Tue, Aug 16, 2022 - Thu, Aug 18, 2022

10:00 AM - 03:00 PM MDT

The Online Teaching Institute at the Centre for Teaching and Learning (University of Alberta) provides opportunities for instructors to develop new skills, ideas, and understandings of various aspects of teaching and learning.

Agenda


Tuesday, August 16

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM MDT

Opening Prayer, Welcome and Opening Remarks

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM MDT

Mirror, Mirror: Criticality, Personal Narrative, and Reflective Teaching

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM MDT

A Call to Action: Centring Indigenous Methodologies and Approaches Part 1

12:45 PM - 02:15 PM MDT

Mirror, Mirror: Building Reflective Capacity in the Contemporary Classroom

02:30 PM - 03:00 PM MDT

Open Consultations

Wednesday, August 17

10:00 AM - 11:15 AM MDT

Educational Leadership Session: Planning and Implementing Departmental Changes to Programming and Teaching Practices

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM MDT

A Call to Action: Centring Indigenous Methodologies and Approaches Part 2

12:45 PM - 01:30 PM MDT

Community Conversation: Building Meaningful Relationships in Your Classroom

01:45 PM - 03:00 PM MDT

Organizing your online teaching environment and establishing your instructor presence

Thursday, August 18

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM MDT

Let's Learn…Hybridly!

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM MDT

A Call to Action: Centring Indigenous Methodologies and Approaches Part 3

12:45 PM - 02:15 PM MDT

What is EDI—and how can we weave EDI principles into our practice (learning and teaching)?

02:30 PM - 03:00 PM MDT

Open Consultations

Tuesday, August 16

Join us as we open with a prayer from Elder John Bigstone followed by our Executive Director, Tommy Mayberry, who will be welcoming all participants to the 4th Annual Online Teaching Institute.

In this session, Brad Ambury (Lead Educational Developer for Assessment and Evaluation) provides an overview of reflective teaching practices. Together we will explore different approaches to reflective practice and examine how reflection can be actively incorporated into effective teaching practice.


The session will outline the key roles criticality and personal narrative can play in forming a meaningful framework for reflection, helping to guide efforts to become a more effective educator. This discussion will then focus on the ways instructors can work to find mirrors for self-reflection—teacher as whole person, teaching events, prior learning experiences, students and student feedback, and theory—which will help promote improved knowledge and practice.


Finally, in the context of post-USRI multifaceted teaching evaluations, the importance of employing critical reflection when developing a teaching dossier will be briefly discussed. 


Session 1 of 3: Presentation

In releasing the final findings in 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) made 94 Calls to Action “in order to redress the legacy of residential Schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation”. 


Nineteen of these Calls to Action have direct implications for post-secondary settings and those working within these settings. They address the education of students and the implementation of course content.


Over three sessions you will have an opportunity to learn local Indigneous knowledge systems and learn:

  1. foundational approaches to understanding Indigenous ethics;
  2. reciprocal and relationship-building exercises and opportunities for Indigenous knowledge gathering and teaching;
  3. how to identify and overcome potential obstacles when it comes to incorporating true Indigenous knowledge systems in a good way.


The goal is to build a foundational teaching and learning approach (no matter what the subject area is) which is local and Indigenous approved. Our journey towards reconciliation can be a creative and positive journey if we are collaborating respectfully together, while making space for local, sovereign, and self-governing knowledge systems to take the lead.


Incorporating critical reflection nurtures academic maturity by acknowledging students on a holistic level (as embodied humans with their own unique values, experiences, and goals). While there are many approaches for engaging students in critical reflection, unique classroom contexts and goals will also inform the design and implementation process of reflective work.


Mandy and Dalbir will offer an overview of reflective practices which can be incorporated into classrooms across and within disciplines, as well as posing some questions for consideration when choosing how to work with students to develop reflexive capacity.


Participants will be encouraged to participate in group and individual reflection and brainstorming throughout the session, with a goal of co-developing a shared resource which can be used in your future course design and implementation processes.


Do you have a question about...

  • Educational technologies,
  • Online pedagogies,
  • Activities and assessments,
  • Equity, diversity, and inclusivity (EDI),
  • or another aspect of your teaching?


This drop-in session allows instructors to have a one-on-one consultation with an educational developer. Breakout rooms will be available to ensure your one-on-one can be interruption free!


Wednesday, August 17

As a formal or informal educational leader responsible for changes in teaching and learning, (i.e.: changes in framework, curriculum, course description & objectives, mode of delivery, strategies, and teaching evaluation), you have likely faced questions like: 

  • How do I get our instructors onboard with changes? 
  • How can I make inroads with instructors who are resistant to changes in their teaching practices and approaches?



Dr. Cosette Lemelin, Assistant Director at CTL will share examples from nearly 20 years in post-secondary education roles and evidence from the current literature on making faculty or departmental level educational and instructional changes. 

Session 2 of 3: Workshop

In releasing the final findings in 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) made 94 Calls to Action “in order to redress the legacy of residential Schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation”. 


Nineteen of these Calls to Action have direct implications for post-secondary settings and those working within these settings. They address the education of students and the implementation of course content.


Over three sessions you will have an opportunity to learn local Indigneous knowledge systems and learn:

  1. foundational approaches to understanding Indigenous ethics;
  2. reciprocal and relationship-building exercises and opportunities for Indigenous knowledge gathering and teaching;
  3. how to identify and overcome potential obstacles when it comes to incorporating true Indigenous knowledge systems in a good way.


The goal is to build a foundational teaching and learning approach (no matter what the subject area is) which is local and Indigenous approved. Our journey towards reconciliation can be a creative and positive journey if we are collaborating respectfully together, while making space for local, sovereign, and self-governing knowledge systems to take the lead.



One big theme in conversations about teaching and learning over the past few years relates to how instructors can build trusting, equitable, and caring relationships within their classrooms to facilitate learning access and engagement, especially at times of uncertainty and stress.


As the Lead Educational Developer for Digital Pedagogies and Writing Across the Curriculum at CTL, Mandy will facilitate a conversation among participants on the different ways we can nurture and sustain relationships in the classroom. Together, we will think about some of the strategies and approaches which have worked well for us, what we’ve learned about what hasn't work well for us, and what we want to take with us or try as we move forward as educators.


This presentation/workshop, delivered by the Educational Technology Instruction and Strategy Team (ETIS) at CTL, will explore two key features of successful online teaching:


  1. effective pedagogical organization of your online teaching environment (eClass);
  2. the importance of developing and maintaining a strong online instructor presence.  


The workshop portion of the presentation will demonstrate how instructors can implement these strategies using course design principles and visual media.

Thursday, August 18

In a hybrid course delivery mode, an instructor teaches in a physical space, such as a classroom, lab, or clinical setting with in-person students and remote students in attendance simultaneously. Remote students participate by way of video conferencing. Hybrid teaching comes with plenty of opportunities and challenges for instructors and students. In this session, you will be a remote attendee in a hybrid situation. Let’s discover and discuss some active learning strategies, working through the pedagogical and technological aspects of hybrid teaching solutions.


Session 3 of 3: Questions

In releasing the final findings in 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) made 94 Calls to Action “in order to redress the legacy of residential Schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation”. 


Nineteen of these Calls to Action have direct implications for post-secondary settings and those working within these settings. They address the education of students and the implementation of course content.


Over three sessions you will have an opportunity to learn local Indigneous knowledge systems and learn:

  1. foundational approaches to understanding Indigenous ethics;
  2. reciprocal and relationship-building exercises and opportunities for Indigenous knowledge gathering and teaching;
  3. how to identify and overcome potential obstacles when it comes to incorporating true Indigenous knowledge systems in a good way.


The goal is to build a foundational teaching and learning approach (no matter what the subject area is) which is local and Indigenous approved. Our journey towards reconciliation can be a creative and positive journey if we are collaborating respectfully together, while making space for local, sovereign, and self-governing knowledge systems to take the lead.



During this interactive session, facilitated by Everett Igobwa, Lead Educational Developer, Critical Pedagogies and Equity, Diversity and Inclusivity, we will examine EDI. We will discuss practical ways of weaving EDI principles into our learning and teaching. To this end, Jaime Yu, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, together with some undergraduate students, will share an EDI curriculum initiative.  Additionally, Lisa Willis, Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences will showcase an EDI pedagogical strategy. We will close this session with connections made across the disciplines. 

Do you have a question about...

  • Educational technologies,
  • Online pedagogies,
  • Activities and assessments,
  • Equity, diversity, and inclusivity (EDI),
  • or another aspect of your teaching?


This drop-in session allows instructors to have a one-on-one consultation with an educational developer. Breakout rooms will be available to ensure your one-on-one can be interruption free!

Speakers


Less More

Elder John Bigstone

Elder

John Bigstone is a Cree Elder who resides in Wabasca, a community situated in North-Eastern region of Alberta. He speaks the Cree and English language fluently and is a member of the Bigstone Cree Nation. His Cree ancestry has many generations of leaders and ceremonial holders. Following the legacy of his proud heritage, John is also a traditional knowledge keeper and ceremonial holder.


His professional background includes a bachelor of social work degree from the University of Regina, Saskatchewan. He was instrumental in the development and management of the Mental Health Program for the Bigstone Cree Nation. He was a mental health counsellor for many years; he has a background in individual, family and group counselling. He has spent many years training as a healing & wellness workshop facilitator; he has extensive experience working within First Nations Communities.


John is also a Reiki Master practicing the art of energy healing. He is also a member of an Elders Committee for the Bigstone Cree Nation Restorative Justice program.


John is a Residential School Survivor; at the age of six he entered the St. Martin Residential School where he was a resident for the next seven years. While in this institution he was mentally, physically, and emotionally abused. Following the trauma of this experience he led a life of self-destructive behavior.


Thirty years ago, John went on a quest to find his Woodland Cree identity. His search led him back to his traditional Cree land teachings and ceremonies. As he began to heal his childhood emotional wounds and traumas as he learned about his place in creation and the sacredness of all life. John is passionate about his teachings and cares deeply about mother earth and all that dwells upon her. He walks his life journey based on the spiritual principles of love, kindness, compassion, respect, humility and courage; the teachings that he shares reflect this philosophy.


John's Cree spirit name is Osow Kihew (Golden Eagle) osow kihew   ᐅᓱᐤ ᑭᐦᐁᐤ

Alex Lomas

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Educational Technologist

Alex (he/him) has been working at the University of Alberta since 2016 and holds a Bachelor of Science (BSc) with a major in Computing Science and a Bachelor of Education (BEd) with a focus on secondary Computing Science education. In his previous role at the Faculty of Extension, he assisted both instructors and students to maximize the educational value of eClass and other online learning applications. His passions focus on making education and technology beneficial and accessible at the post-secondary level. At CTL, he works closely with educational developers and instructional designers to create multimedia content.

Andrea Menard

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Lead Educational Developer, Indigenizing Curricula and Pedagogies

Andrea Menard, LL.B, LL.M (she/they/wiin) is Métis from the abolished Red River Settlement. Andrea has over twenty years of experience relationship-building with Indigenous Nations across Treaties 4, 6, 7, 8, and 10 as well as the Métis Homeland regions across Alberta, and with Indigenous Nations in the unceded lands of British Columbia. Andrea has worked for various organizations that range from academic, government, Treaty-making, and legal non-profit and legal regulatory work, and teaches Reconciliation and Lawyers at the University of Calgary, Faculty of Law as well as In Search of Reconciliation Through Dispute Resolution at Osgoode Hall Law School. As a Lead Educational Developer at CTL, Andrea focusses on situating Indigenous methodologies and centering Indigenous knowledges in epistemology, laws, and in academic research, teaching, and learning, as well as utilizing Indigenous ethics and engaging with Indigenous communities in reciprocal and respectful manners.

Anita Parker

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Lead Educational Developer, Online and Hybrid Instruction and Strategy

Anita brings two decades of science teaching in in-person, online, and hybrid secondary and post-secondary classrooms to her educational development portfolio at CTL. She is also experienced in leading professional development workshops and individual coaching for instructors with a focus on maximizing student engagement with authentic activities and assessments. Since 2015, Anita has worked closely with instructor teams from across the University with their blended and online learning resources and projects. This includes helping build course frameworks on eClass, planning student-centred learning experiences, and storyboard creation for pre-recorded lecture video content.

Anita enjoys being part of a team that supports teaching and learning excellence in online, hybrid, blended, and face-to-face environments.

Brad Ambury

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Lead Educational Developer, Assessment and Evaluation

Brad brings to his role with the CTL team over 15 years of experience working as a lecturer in four post-secondaries (the University of British Columbia, the University of Colorado at Boulder, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and the University of Alberta). Brad also has 8 years of direct experience working as a Lead Educational Developer at a polytechnic (NAIT) where he undertook a wide range of project work that included both curriculum development and faculty support. His expertise and experience is in building teaching and learning resources, exploring issues related to Writing-Across-the Curriculum, and leading academic program (and course) mapping projects, including their design and development. As a Lead ED with CTL, Brad’s principle areas of interest include (but are not limited to): finding impactful ways to better align curriculum outcomes with meaningful assessment practices; supporting the development of assessment practices to enhance students' learning experiences; and collaborating with faculty to weave relevant assessment processes and practices into the contexts of individual programs and courses.

Bryan Braul

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Lead Educational Developer, Educational Technology Instruction and Strategy

Bryan joins CTL from the Faculty of Extension where he worked for 22 years in roles ranging from English Language Instructor, eLearning Developer, Educational Administrator, and Team Lead at the Learning Engagement Office.


While at Extension, he was given opportunities in a number of different roles but perhaps the ones listed above are representative of his experience there. For example, his official title when he started at LEO was eLearning Developer but when the instructional designer positions were cut, he filled that role when needed. He has also worked on curriculum/program design, served on several committees, ran an ESL summer program and was part of the Micro Credential/Digital Badging pilot project at the U of A.

Christopher Borger

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Instructional Designer

Chris Borger (BEd, University of Alberta) is an educator and performer based in Edmonton. Joining the CTL team in 2020, Chris is a driving force behind CTL's website content. Combining his passions for performance and education, Chris has worked for both the Telus World of Science (Edmonton) as well as Science World (Vancouver) in roles that ranged from performing in Science Shows to managing teams. He has also worked for Rapid Fire Theatre as a professional improviser and educator since 2011, and as well produces video content for the CBC Comedy website in addition to the Nation Network (Oilersnation) media group.

Cosette Lemelin

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Assistant Director

Cosette has 17 years of experience in Educational Developer roles in a 20-year career in adult and post-secondary education at three universities (the University of Winnipeg, the University of Manitoba, and the University of Alberta). She has a Master of Education (2003) and PhD in Education (2016) focusing on adult and post-secondary education. Cosette’s unique specialities include teaching within health professions education (with a focus on clinical practicum teaching and learning), classroom management, and varying aspects of interpersonal communication in teaching and learning. Cosette calls herself a “Teaching Coach” for university instructors and faculty members striving to improve their teaching one class, one activity, or one interaction at a time. Cosette is the 2019 recipient of the University of Alberta Excellence in Learning Support Award, and received the award again in 2020 with the CTL Team as part of their COVID 19 Response.

Dalbir Sehmby

Centre for Teaching and Learning, CTL

Educational Developer, Writing and Multimodal Communication Pedagogies

An award-winning instructor with over 20 years of experience across multiple fields, Dalbir Sehmby (PhD, Comparative Literature and Film/Media Studies) views teaching as a skill that requires continual practice and classrooms as spaces that alter with each cohort. As an Educational Developer, Dr. Sehmby does not adhere to one methodology but mixes established and contemporary approaches while seeking insights from instructors, guidance from learning outcomes, and advice from students. A TEDx speaker and the University of Alberta’s 2016 Last Lecturer, Dalbir values clear communication as a common denominator in composing across curricula and multimodal media. Dalbir has innovated learning via the “Stresstival” methodology, which privileges student-centred skill building, emotional self-awareness, and life-work balance. Dalbir believes it is possible for instructors and students to be a responsible team of holistic learners who can laugh and learn while cooperating to create a healthy campus community of champions.

Everett Igobwa

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Lead Educational Developer, Critical Pedagogies and Equity, Diversity and Inclusivity

Everett Igobwa, PhD (ABD), MA, BEd has over 19 years experience as an educator in contexts ranging from K-12 to post-secondary education, including roles supporting faculty and graduate students at Queen’s University, York University, Yukon University and University of Alberta.

Everett is interested in Equity, Diversity, and Inclusivity (EDI), critical pedagogies, decolonization, indigenization, developing and co-facilitating the Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW) training, course design and redesign, student-centred pedagogy, professional development for faculty, online, hybrid and blended pedagogy.

Collaborating with instructors to demystify teaching and learning is rewarding and meaningful to Everett.

Gian Marco Visconti

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Educational Technologist

Gian Marco (he/him) is a librarian and urbanist (MLIS, University of Alberta; and MPlan, University of Calgary) with a passion for podcasting and open education. He also brings his experience as an audio storyteller at CJSR-FM and the Edmonton City as Museum Project (ECAMP). Prior to joining the CTL Team, Gian Marco supported the design and delivery of online continuing education programs at the Faculty of Extension at the University of Alberta. At CTL, he’s involved in creating multimedia content to partner with instructors toward improving their teaching.

A. Graeme Pate

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Lead Educational Developer, Instructional Practice and Academic Development

Graeme Pate has substantial experience with integrating effective teaching methodologies and educational technology. Graeme spent 28 years working in Scotland in education, eighteen of which were spent at the University of Glasgow, developing innovative instructional materials as well as designing and modelling innovative TEAL (Technology-Enhanced Active Learning) approaches such as flipped teaching (blended learning), backchannel discussions, advanced use of Moodle (eClass) as well as using Twitter & online voting systems during lectures and tutorials to engage learners. He was the Programme Director for the MA Primary Education and the B.Ed (Hons) degree programmes and was presented with three Excellence in Teaching awards by the University of Glasgow for design, implementation of teaching methods and the use of technology to enhance learning.


One of Graeme's specialties is supporting instructors who wish to be more confident and competent in their use of technology to enhance their planning, facilitation, and/or assessment of student learning.

Mandy Penney

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Lead Educational Developer, Digital Pedagogies and Writing Across the Curriculum

Mandy (she/her) is a queer settler and scholar and an experienced educator originally from Newfoundland. Holding degrees in both the sciences and the humanities (BSc, BA(Hon), and MA), she is passionate about digital pedagogies, writing instruction, accessibility, and communities of practice/care. She has worked as both faculty and academic staff (i.e., parafaculty), including as a coordinator of a writing and learning centre. Mandy advocates for equitable, values-driven, and relationship-based practices in teaching and learning: practices that can be approached through digital and writing-based community-building. She is an active member of the Canadian Writing Centres Association and the International Writing Centres Association, as well as a co-editor of a special conference edition of Discourse and Writing / Rédactologie. Mandy aims to collaborate with the University of Alberta community toward (re)imagining teaching and learning possibilities at this important and challenging global moment.

Mike Robertson

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Multimedia Content Designer

Mike Robertson (Bachelor of Film and Media Studies, University of Alberta) is a filmmaker and performer based in Edmonton. Mike works with CTL as a multidisciplinary media editor, creating most of the videos, graphics and podcasts that the Center for Teaching and Learning creates. His previous employment entailed creating MOOCs for the University of Alberta, including shooting and editing on Indigenous Canada, Mountains 101 and Black Holes.

Tommy Mayberry

Centre for Teaching and Learning, UofA

Executive Director

Tommy (he/she/they) is a scholar, professional, and academic drag queen with a background in diverse teaching and instructional facilitation in academia as well as industry. As a sought-after speaker on the topics of “Gender Pronouns and Cultures of Respect” as well as visual pedagogies and LGBTQIA+ inclusivity, Tommy has presented their scholarship and research findings nationally as well as internationally, in places such as Oxford, Washington DC, Tokyo, and Honolulu. They strive to embody and model decolonial, anti-racist, and equity-driven intersectional visions and leadership.

Tommy was a SSHRC Doctoral Fellow during their PhD work and is also a recipient of the University of Waterloo’s Award for Exceptional Teaching. They are co-editor of the book RuPedagogies of Realness: Essays on Teaching and Learning with RuPaul's Drag Race (McFarland 2022), and they serve as a founding incorporator and director of a new not-for-profit organization for educational development across this nation we now call Canada.